Emerald Ash Borer Update

UPDATE (April 23,2017) – Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Update

As we move into year five of our EAB Infestation Cycle, following is information on Saving Your Ash Tree(s), Recurring Treatment, and Reporting a Suspected Dying Ash Tree to the City of Lenexa.

Saving Your Ash Tree(s)

Interesting data was presented in February 2017 based upon ongoing studies funded by the USDA Forest Service.  The data highlights the fact that saving an Ash tree is not a lifetime of “every two-year treatments”. The data indicates that an EAB infestation cycle is approximately 10 years. To save an Ash tree during that 10 years, you have to be very aggressive in your treatment process and then you can move to a maintenance process.  The cycle is as follows:

Year(s) in Area EAB Population (thinning of canopy by 30% or more) Affected Ash Trees
1 2% 1%
2 5% 2%
3 8% 5%
4 17% 8%
5 32% 17%
6 65% 32%
7 90% 65%
8 100% 100%
9 90% 100%
10 15% 100%
11-17 <10% 100%

What the cycle tells us is that for the first 4 years, there is very little outward exposure given that less than 1 in 10 Ash trees is showing a thinning of their canopy by 30% or more.  In year 5, it moves to approximately 1 in 5 Ash trees, year 6 moves to approximately 1 in 3 Ash trees, year 7 to more than 1 in 2 Ash trees and in year 8, 100 percent of all “untreated” Ash trees are affected by a thinning of their tree canopy by 30% or more.  The only trees that survive after year 8 are the Ash trees that have been properly treated.  Starting in year 9, you will start to see a drop in EAB population (90%) as their food supply is no longer available given the dying off of the untreated Ash trees. In year 10, we will see a crash in the EAB population down to 15% due to the lack of food supply.  In year 11, a monitoring phase can be started on the previously treated Ash trees to determine if and when any additional treatments will be required. A key indicator for new infestation will be new Woodpecker pecks as well as a thinning of the tree canopy. At this point, retreating can be restarted but at a more spread out interval (3-5 years) as determined by your ongoing monitoring.

 

Key Points to Consider:

  •         Treatment is “NOT” a lifetime commitment of every two-year treatments.  If after an arborist review, you are able to start treatment this year on your tree(s), you will most likely only have three treatment periods before moving to a maintenance/monitoring period since 2018 is seen as year five of our infestation cycle..
  •         Treating in the Spring has shown to be more effective in reducing canopy thinning.
  •         If your Ash tree has reached a point of 30% or more thinning of the tree canopy, the tree probably cannot be saved or is worth saving. Consult an arborist for recommendation.
  •         We continue to work with a treatment provider, Urban Tree Specialist, to provide their services at a greatly reduced rate to the Oak Hill homeowners.  To schedule a tree evaluation and receive a treatment quote, Urban Tree Specialist can be reached at 816-214-8327.

Recurring Treatment

If you treated your Ash tree(s) in 2016, you will want to retreat your tree(s) again this year. Treatments normally start in mid-May.  In speaking with Nick at Urban Tree Specialist, he will be reaching out to their past customers prior to mid-May to schedule their recurring treatment as well as any other service.

 

Reporting a Suspected Dying Ash Tree to the City of Lenexa

  •         Log onto the City of Lenexa website (www.lenexa.com) and click on Report A Problem.
  •         Select “Tree” and then “On Private Property”.
  •         Complete the form and then submit. Submission can be done anonymous.
  •         Submitted Lenexa Problem Request is forward to Community Standards for inspection.

o   At the request of Community Standards, a City of Lenexa Parks arborist will go out to evaluate the tree.

o   After evaluation, the arborist will work with Community Standards to provide the homeowner with their recommended options.

o   If a tree is 60 percent or more dead, the homeowner will be provided a written notice to remove the tree within a reasonable time frame. The written notice may be waived if the condition of the tree is determined to present and immediate hazard.

o   From the date of the written removal notice, the homeowner will have a time period to request an appeal hearing with the city if they do not agree with the city’s request.

o   Should a homeowner not comply with the violation notice or request a hearing, then the city has the power to impose the abatement process which can include ticketing the homeowner or hiring a commercial service provider to remove the tree at the homeowner’s cost.   Also, according to code, the city can place a lien on the homeowner’s property to cover the cost of the tree removal.

Questions ?

Randy Stephens

Oak Hill Home Association

 

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Update – 8/14/2017

As we move toward the end of the summer, I (Randy Stephens, HOA EAB Chair) want to pass on some updated EAB information that is specific to our Oak Hill neighborhood:

  •         We have 186 homeowners with street side Ash trees
  •         To date, 110 (or 60 percent) of the homeowners have treated their Ash trees
  •         We are currently in year 4 of the EAB infestation cycle which will normally last 10 years
  •         In year 5, the number of “untreated” trees lost will double as well as the number of trees showing outward signs of EAB infestation (thinning of the tree canopy, woodpecker damage, bark splits, and water sprouts at the tree base) will also double

 

Key Points to Consider:

  •         Treatment is “NOT” a lifetime commitment of every two-year treatments.  If you start this year, you will most likely only have 3 to 4 treatment periods before moving to a maintenance/monitoring period
  •         If an Ash tree is not treated, it will die given that the tree cannot protect itself from the Emerald  Ash Borer
  •         Losing 40 percent of our street side Ash trees will greatly change the appearance of our neighborhood
  •         If your Ash tree has reached a point of 30% or more thinning of the tree canopy, the tree probably cannot be saved or is worth saving. Consult an arborist for recommendation

 

Next Steps:

  •         If you desire to save your Ash tree(s), near-term action is required as once an EAB infested tree becomes too unhealthy it cannot be effectively treated
  •         Tree injection treatments will continue thru approximately the end of September

 

As a reminder, we continue to work with a treatment provider, Urban Tree Specialist, to provide their services at a greatly reduced rate to the Oak Hill homeowners.  To schedule a tree evaluation and receive a treatment quote, Urban Tree Specialist can be reached at 816-214-8327.

You can contact them at urbantreekc.com .   Mention the Oak Hill discount.

Thank you,

Randy Stephens
Oak Hill Homes Association Board

 

 

Questions or Want to Learn more about Saving your Tree?

Oak Hill Neighborhood EAB Progress

The Oak Hill Board recently hired an arborist to inventory and assess the 264 street facing Ash trees in our neighborhood.   That survey is now up on the Oak Hill website at www.oakhillhomes.org  under the “Emerald Ash Borer Update” tab.

In the document it details all of the trees for each home in Oak Hill.  The diameter of each tree is detailed as well as the condition of the tree ranking either Excellent, Good, Fair or Poor. No tree in Oak Hill currently shows any signs of EAB.

34 Ash Trees in the common area along Lackman & 79th street were also inventoried.  These trees were all rated as poor as they run underneath power lines and have routinely been trimmed back by the city and KCP&L.

The Oak Hill Board recommends treating all Ash trees with a Fair rating or better to prevent EAB infestation.    We are working on obtaining a discount on the treatment for Oak Hill Homeowners.  We also plan to hold two informational sessions later in July for Oak Hill Homeowners to get more information about treatment options.

The Emerald Ash Borer beetle infests and destroys ash trees, which make up approximately 25% of the trees in Lenexa.

For more information on the Emerald Ash Borer,  you can consult the following website.  www.lenexa.com/parks/trees.html
Sincerely,
The Oak Hill HOA Board

Oak Hill HOA Ash Tree Inventory

KEY TO READING:
There are 4 conditions and/or columns. Each location/house might have a front tree which won’t have a location or (n,s,e,w). Some houses have multiple street trees and that is where the directions come into play. DBH stands for diameter. This will be important when we finalize the treatment discount. Treatment plans tend to be two years plans and based on the diameter of the trees.

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